Volume:

1 to 4 oz. 

 

Uses:

shooters,

cordials, singles.

Tall Glass

Pint Glass

Rocks Glass 

Bar Glassware

Shot Glass

Tumbler Family

 

Volume:

5 to 12 oz. 

 

Uses: 

Tumblers are classifyied as flat bottomed drinking glasses. So, today you may find traditional stemed glassware now in tumbler format.  For example, wine glasses now come stemless making them tumblers by definition.   

Pilsner Glass

The standard shot glass is a little over 2 inches tall and 1 1/2 inches in diameter at the base. It holds about 1.5 oz. of alcohol. Quality shot glasses are made with thicker glass than typical glassware. They are made this way because it is tradition when taking a shot to throw the contents back quickly, then slam the glass down onto the table. The glass needs to be thicker otherwise it could break.  A pony shot is a shorter or smaller version of a shot glass. It only holds about 1 oz. of liquor. A "cheater glass" refers to a shot glass that appears to be the same size as a normal shot glass, but the glass is thicker than usual, so less liquid fits into the shot.  A "shooter" is a type of shot that contains alcohol as well as a mixer. These types of shots are typically taken in longer, cylindrical shot glasses. Cylindrical shot glasses are narrow and the narrowest sometimes resemble a test tube. Flared shot glasses are about 3 inches in height and the mouth is wider than the base. Similarly, tonic shots come in a glass that looks like a miniature version of a real tonic glass, with a wide mouth that slowly gets narrower. It is not recommended to slam taller shot glasses because they are usually made out of thinner glass.

An "Old Fashioned" glasses or single rocks glass is a smaller style of rocks glass usually between 5 - 7 ounces in volume. Single rocks glasses should be used for one liquor with ice, or duos.   Bucket and Low Ball glasses or Double Rocks glasses can be 8 to 12 ounces in volume.  Double Rocks glasses should be used for short versions of high balls.     

Tall Glasses are also known as Hi-Balls or Collins.  Hi-Ball glasses are usually around 7 to 10 ounces in volume.  Whereas, Collins glasses are typically 10 to 14 ounces in volume.  Collins glasses are the slender brother to the Highball glass.  Tall glasses are used for most drinks that use juices and mixers.   

White wine glasses are sometimes called chalice or goblets.  Traditionally, the white wine glasses are wide mouthed glasses function promoting rapid oxidation which alters the flavor of the wine.

Volume:

7 to 14 oz. 

Uses:

Bloody Mary, Harvey Wallbanger

Volume:

12 - 16 oz. 

Uses:

Beer Glass

Conical (or sleevers) glasses are shaped, as the name suggests, as an inverted truncated cone around 6 inches tall and tapering by about 1 inch in diameter over its height. Also called a "shaker pint" as the glass can be used as one half of a Boston shaker. The nonic, or "straight glass", a variation on the conical design, where the glass bulges out a couple of inches from the top; this is partly for improved grip, partly to prevent the glasses from sticking together when stacked, and partly to give strength and stop the rim from becoming chipped or "nicked".  Jug glasses, or "dimple mugs", are shaped more like a large mug with a handle. This sort of glass is also known as a "Handle" or "Jug" due to the handle on the glass.  Tulip is a more modern glass having a taller shape, usually flaring out towards the top; these designs are more commonly associated with continental lagers or promotional campaigns by breweries, and are frequently etched or marked with the beer's label.

 

Volume:

12 - 16 oz. 

Uses:

Beer Glass

A pilsner glass is used for many types of light beers, including pale lager or pilsner.  They are tall, slender and tapered. The slender glass will reveal the colour, and carbonation of the beer, and the broad top will help maintain a beer head while offering the guest a better aroma.  Many people confuse Pilsner Glasses with Weisen Glasses which are a little bit smaller in size.

Snifter

Volume:

1 to 4 oz. 

 

Uses:

Brown Spirits

Cordials, Singles, Imperial Stouts, Barley Wines, etc...

Cocktail Glass

 

Volume:

5 to 12 oz. 

 

Uses: 

Flute

Volume:

7 to 14 oz. 

Uses:

Champagne, Sparkling Wines, Champagne Cocktails, Lambic  Beers, etc...

White Wine 

Volume:

12 - 16 oz. 

Uses:

White Wines, Belgium IPA's, White Wine Spritzers, etc...

Stemmed Family

Stemware is drinkware that stands on stems above a base. It is usually made from glass, but may be made from ceramics or metals.  Today, we find many tradional stemmed family now made with out stems.  

Red Wine Glasses come in various shapes and sizes.  But traditionally the bowl will be fuller and rounder with a larger opening to allow you to dip your nose into the glass to detect aroma. And, as mentioned above, the complex aromas and flavors of red wine demand a glass with a larger surface area so the wine comes in contact with more air. A Bordeaux glass is taller, yet the bowl is not quite as large. It is designed for full bodied, heavier red wines such as Cabernets and Merlots. The tallness of the glass allows the wine to proceed directly to the back of the mouth to maximize its flavor. A Burgundy glass is for lighter, full bodied wines such as Pinot Noir. It is not as tall, but the bowl is larger than the Bordeaux glass, directing the wine to the tip of the tongue to taste its more delicate flavors.

The flute is a stem glass with a tall, narrow bowl. The bowl of a flute may resemble either a narrow wine glass, a trumpet shape or be very narrow and straight-sided.  As with other stemware, the stem allows the drinker to hold the glass without affecting the temperature of the drink. The bowl is designed to retain champagne's signature carbonation, by reducing the surface area at the opening of the bowl. The deep bowl also enhances the visual effect of the bubbles rising through the liquid to the top. The flute has largely replaced the champagne coupe or saucer, the shape of which allowed carbonation to dissipate even more rapidly than from a standard wine glass. Its smaller diameter also allows more flutes to be carried on a tray.

This glass was originally known as a Cocktail Glass.  Thoughout the years, it was often incorrectly referred to as a martini glass.  Today, most people consider this to be a Martini glass  It has a triangle-bowl design with a long stem, and is used for a wide range of straight-up (without ice) cocktails, including martinis, manhattans, metropolitans, and gimlets. 

The Snifter is also known as a brandy snifter, a cognac glass, or a balloon glass - is a type of stemware, a short-stemmed glass whose vessel has a wide bottom and a relatively narrow top. It is mostly used to serve aged brown spirits such as brandy and whisky.  However, many beers are served in Snifters as well.

Red Wine

Volume:

12 - 16 oz. 

Uses:

Red Wine, Sangria, etc...

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Bar Essentials